The best sci-fi films

Latest post in my blog on popular science:
The best sci-fi films
https://populscience.blogspot.com/2023/01/the-best-sci-fi-films.html

Regards,

Manuel, I would be interested in your “take” on this article! https://apple.news/AdT566CuiTSeyXn–JQVqNw

Thanks, Mike, for the reference, which I hadn’t seen (the scientific paper discussed was published on December 30, this popularization today).

My last post in my blog (https://populscience.blogspot.com/2023/01/the-world-of-tachyons-and-science.html) addresses the same questions as this paper. This shows that this research is not exactly new. In fact, the popular paper says practically nothing new; except that one of the authors of the scientific paper declares his belief in the real existence of tachyons.

I have also looked at the scientific paper, and found that there is little new. The cinematic of the tachyon world is known since a long time ago. Perhaps there’s something new in the dynamic, but I’ve noticed that they don’t mention Tegmark’s paper, which proves that orienting in a tachyon world would be impossible. Tegmark’s paper, which can be considered a preliminary of this paper, was published in 1997, 25 years ago.

I consider this paper as another mathematical exercise without practical consequences. In other words, sci-fi.

Regards,

Yes, I had seen your reporting on orienting/navigating in a faster-than-light environment as likely “impossible,” but I was more interested in what you would say about the proposal that incorporating the existence of a faster-than-light “observer” can mathematically unite/reconcile general relativity with quantum theory into a kind of “quantum gravity” theory. I sense that you are dismissing it as a mathematical trick or exercise with no link to objective reality, but I’m wondering if that is too hasty? There aren’t many candidates (in my math-limited knowledge base) that can do that so neatly… or am I wrong about that?

Thanks for taking the time to reply. And sorry to SpareOomers for the lack of a Lewis link, who I do not think ever used faster-than-light concepts in his body of work. Or am I wrong about that, too?

Michael